Midwifery and Women's Health

Midwifery and Women's Health


Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, which affects the heart, it is a disease which is causing fatal deaths among women. It was initially believed that the disease only affects men. However, women currently are the most suffering from it. The common symptoms of heart disease in women in severe pain, pressure, and discomfort in the chest. It is essential to know your blood pressure and keep it in check with the supervision of a doctor. Women who smoke should know that smoking increases the risk of heart disease and should consider quitting(Heart Attack Symptoms in Women, 2013).

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Especially with African- American women in Mississippi, Mississippi, is known to be the fattest state in America, the obese state. Aging and menopause for a woman can also lead to heart failure. When a woman is going through menopause the chances of her getting a heart disease rises dramatically (Heart Attack Symptoms in Women, 2013). In African-American women, the risks of getting heart disease are much more significant then what most people would expect. It is essential for African-American women who have high blood pressure and diabetes to get regular cholesterol screenings. For the mental status of black women, when one gets depressed, it can be the development of heart disease is well known healthy people (Saeed, Kampangkaew & Nambi, 2017).
Depressions, anxiety, isolation from the world are known to be psychosocial factors that can increasingly put a black woman at risk for heart disease also. Prevention is key to taking back control of a woman's body. Women should have regular check-ups once a year from their primary doctors. More physical activity can make a woman healthier. Women can get involved with programs such as yoga, are bike riding. To prevent heart disease, women who smoke should quit smoking, increase their physical activity, and choose a healthier eating lifestyle by eating right and changing one's diet. The new diet should include high fiber, low sodium, low fat, and lean meat.
Starting this new diet will affect a woman's weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Woman must follow through with the dietary program that their primary physician put them on. Once they put on this new program, they must follow through with the program (Heart Attack Symptoms in Women, 2013). They must watch their weight, their cholesterol levels, and if one has diabetes, they have to watch their sugar intake as well. Black women with a history of heart conditions should exercise daily for about 60-90 minutes. Biking, swimming aerobics, walking are all great examples of moderate physical activity for a woman at the age of 60 and older.
Preventive actions need to take place to catch heart disease at an early stage. Many times in African-American woman, the underlying condition needs treatment to treat the current illness. Medications that doctors would prescribe to treat heart disease would consist of nitrates, beta blockers, and anti-platelet drugs (Gurzău, Caloian, Fringu, F., Cismaru, Zdrenghea , & Pop, 2018). These drugs help the heart pump better and more efficiency. They also decrease the risk of injury. Surgery can also be a form of treatment. Stents may be put in during an operation to keep the arteries open and keep them from being blocked by clots. If other treatments fail, then the patient may have coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (mayo clinic). In this surgery, the blocked arteries are avoided, and the medicine will decrease pain and discomfort, and improve the quality of a woman's life (Heart Attack Symptoms in Women, 2013).
The Tobacco Quit Line is a hotline that offers support and free medications for anyone who wants to quit. Alcohol consumption should be limited to a glass of wine, or one beer, or no more than 5oz of liquor per day. It is suspected believed that small amounts of alcohol may have some health benefits that can protect from the heart from certain heart conditions (Heart Disease Fact Sheet, 2013). Alcohol in moderation can help by assisting in the prevention prevent of artery damage caused by high LDL cholesterol while raising the HDL levels of cholesterol. It is not recommended to begin consuming alcohol if not already a part of the diet. The same benefits can be accomplished with proper diet and exercise.
Maintaining a healthy weight is important for heart health as well as overall health. Eating a balanced diet of lean meats and fresh fruits and vegetables while limiting fat intake can prevent many heart conditions (Rosano, Spoletini, & Vitale, 2017). Women can feel empowered knowing that they can take action when it comes to their health and protect themselves from preventable heart conditions (Heart Attack Symptoms in Women, 2013).
In comparing the best practice and the current practice, it is clear that medical providers have come with best practices to reduce the effect of heart attack in women. Current practice has been facing various challenges making many women to suffer. In addition, CDC has modified the risk factors to concur the effects of the disease among women. In conclusion, heart disease is killing our black woman more than cancer. A black woman needs to take back control of their bodies and should want to start living a healthier lifestyle. If a black woman is getting the shorter end of the stick for treatment, she should take initiative to work on their health with the support of friends and loved ones. No one should go through pain and discomfort alone. Just like there is a support group to stand up to cancer, there needs to be a support group for women with heart conditions.

References

1. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women." Heart Attack Symptoms in Women(2013.). N.p., n.d. Web. 13 March. 2013.
2. Gurz?u, D., Caloian, B., Fringu, F., Cismaru, G., Zdrenghea, D., and Pop, D. (2018). The role of cardiovascular rehabilitation in women with ischemic heart disease and rhythm disorders. Balneo Research Journal, 9(2), 50–53. https://doi.org/10.12680/balneo.2018.171
3. Rosano, G. M. C., Spoletini, I., and Vitale, C. (2017). Cardiovascular disease in women, is it different to men? The role of sex hormones. Climacteric, 20(2), 125–128. https://doi.org/10.1080/13697137.2017.1291780
4. Saeed, A., Kampangkaew, J., and Nambi, V. (2017). Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal, 13(4), 185–192. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=trueanddb=aphandAN=127105148andsite=ehost-live n.d. Web. 13 March. 2013.

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